Marcus Garvey was notably thefirst Back leader in American history to capture the imagination and loyalty of the Black masses. He was thefirst to stir their pride by asserting that African Americans were members of a proud race with their own stimulating history, tradition, and culture. In his speeches, editorials, and even his poetry, Marcus Garvey constantly reminded his followers that, whatever their present troubles, they were the descendants of a powerful race whose past glories promised future greatness once the Black people of the world united to achieve a common destiny. He urged Negroes to think and act Black, to be proud of their Black skin and unique features, to acknowledge and know their history, and to admire and respect their Black heroes. This is clearly depicted in his hard work put into the development of: "Garveyism," the Negro World, and the earliest international agenda for his people's rights during the UNIA's fist international congress. In conjunction with the notions presented, Garvey also asserted that people of African decent should worship a Black God and a Black Christ within their different religious dominations**.This strengthening of the Negro self-image, which has been badly treated by generations of brutal exploitation under slavery and inadequate freedom and rights, proved to be Garvey's most enduring legacy and left an unforgettable mark upon the Negro world.
Marcus Garvey was born in 1887 on the Caribbean island of Jamaica. Soon after Garvey started school he withdrew and began a job as a printer's apprentice in the year 1904. After leading an unsuccessful printers strike in Jamaica in 1907, he became interested in making a change and becoming skeptical of the value of human and trade unions for Blacks (Cronon 11). Marcus Garvey then edited several newspapers in Costa Rica and Panama and in 1912 studied abroad in London. He began writing African publications and…