Rough, vigorous, hot-tempered and rich is what Mark Twain grew up to be. Born 1835 in Missouri, Florida he always did what he needed to in order for him to reach his goal. Even though he dropped out of school at the age of twelve, when his father died, he accomplished numerous things.
Mark began writing when he took the job of a journalist. The tale ‘The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County’ was hisfirst success. After a trip by boat to Palestine, he wrote The Innocents Abroad. As his writing career blossomed, he also became successful as a lecturer. In 1870 got married, and a few years later he and his wife settled in Hartford, Connecticut. Huckleberry Finn is Twain’s masterpiece, for its use of the brilliant character and descriptions, showing the humor of man’s cruelty to man.
He also wrote The Gilded Age, 1873, Old Times on the Mississippi, 1875, The Prince and the Pauper, 1882, Life on the Mississippi, 1883, Pudd’n-head Wilson, 1894, and Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc, 1896. His later works, such as The Mysterious Stranger, unpublished until 1916, are not as amusing and more discouraging. He is known as one of America’s finest and most characteristic writers.
1872 is the year when Roughing It was written. This book was just a personal narrative and not a history to show-off, nor a thoughtful commentary. It’s a record of several years of exciting migration, and it’s intention to help the reader rather than to hurt him with truth, or fill him with science. In this book there is lots of information about episodes that happened in the Wild West. There is stories in this book that have never been told and only been seen in the writers own eyes. There is a great deal of information in this book and the writer himself says this book can not be helped, but Twain was never exactly worried about giving his books an artistic framework. The information that he wrote came out of him naturally. He felt this urge to wr…