Today, there are humans all over the world that are looked up to.Celebrities, beauty queens, and athletes are placed on pedestals because people worship them.Worship, however, does not equal perfection.In William Shakespeare's The Tempest, innocent Miranda is placed on a pedestal although she is not perfect.Miranda's love, not perfection, helps her father, Prospero reconcile with his brother, Antionio and Alonso, the King of Naples that betrayed him such a long time ago.Miranda is placed on a pedestal and viewed as an almost perfect being throughout the book.
In The Tempest, Prospero places Miranda on a pedestal by giving her an education far better then other princesses.He tells her that although other princesses have trivialities unlike hers, he can still give her an education as a dedicated tutor.Prospero teaches Miranda so much more because he is a magician that knows how important it is to exercise mind and mental strength.Prospero knows that her intense, yet naive knowledge he has blessed her with will develop her character, and is proud to have taught her so much.When Miranda gave Caliban language, she "endowed thy purposes with words that made them known."Although Miranda teaching Caliban does not replace his savage spirit, Miranda returns the education her father has given her to Caliban.Miranda obviously knows the language well enough to go back and teach it to others.
Miranda's beauty is commented on throughout the play and she is even mistaken for a non-mortal.In Ferdinand's amazement, he asks her if she is a young woman or not.Miranda is so beautiful that Ferdinand thinks that she surpasses any mortal and it is likely impossible for her to speak his language.When she replies back telling him not to marvel, it is apparent that she takes his compliment to her beauty very lightly.Prospero tells Miranda that when he was at sea, she was an angel that saved him …