Throughout the late 1700s to early-to-mid 1800s, with the stability of the union being frequently challenged over every, occasionally petty, disagreement, somehow, both the north and south have found a common ground.Yet, it was only a matter of time when all these so-called compromises revealed their true color as a series of patchwork, or house of cards, that with every addition makes it that much more unstable.Not until the early 1860s did the house of cards finally give way and it was quite clear that neither the north nor the south was able to find that ever so frequent common ground.
In the late 1700s to early 1800s, most of the disputes were over taxes, land settlement, states rights, and legislative representation, though controversial, these were quite a bit easier to deal with and settle as opposed to the slavery issue that would eventually overwhelm society with the introduction of Eli Whitney's cotton gin in 1794.This precipitated a long era of dispute, but fortunately, for men like Henry Clay and John Adams, the "cards" of the Missouri and the 3/5ths compromises for the most part silenced both parties on terms of slavery for the time being.These times were no stranger to instances of violence such as Shay's Rebellion, so in domestic terms, life was not very happy-go-lucky.It was becoming apparent that under the surface of mild sectional strife there was something greater brewing.Maintaining the union was considered as a safeguard against domestic faction and insurrection especially the years after the Treaty of Ghent of the War of 1812 which brought and cemented a greater feeling of unity/nationalism, so people would be less apt to try to challenge and threaten both the safety and stability of his/her country.Therefore, it was no surprise that an agreement had been hastily reached.
The mid 1800s brought, along with economic growth and nationalism, a wave of social, intellectual, and re…