Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, or so the saying goes. What one person finds appealing at sight another might depict as abysmal. Cultural anthropology falls prey to this line of thinking, just like every other existing academic subject. It is simply a part of nature that every set of eyes differs in deciding what is alluring and what is distasteful, regardless of color, creed, and whether nearsightedness or farsightedness (or 20/20 vision) is present. The mere fact that there are a countless number of cultures that are celebrated and lived is a thing of pure beauty, in my opinion. The differing rituals, rites, and passages offered by diverse ethnic groups allows for reflection to take place, reflection of how assorted this world is in a completely varied universe. I like the fact that things are different, and never uniform, especially all aspects having to do with one's heritage. Having studied marriage in three dissimilar subjects, I am entranced by the blunt manner in which they differentiate deeply from one another. After conducting an interview on a Mexican, Pakistani, and Korean, I am able to analyze how marriage in three different cultures could not be more distinct from one another. Additionally, I am able to soak in one of the most exquisite facets of life: diversity.
Hector Rodriguez was born in the Mexican state of Guanajuato and is now a U.S. citizen. He is single and has no immediate plans to get married. I felt a strong affinity for the Mexican culture after completing the interview with myfirst interviewee. Ultimately, I sensed that Hector was satisfied with the way the marriage process functioned in his culture. "Marriages in Mexico are not dreadful or problematic, so to speak. For the most part, they follow traditional guidelines of what a marriage should encompass", he concluded. I posed to him a most-important, difficult question: what should a marriage encompass? Part of the problem with a …